Monday, May 29, 2017
 
NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and...

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and...

NOAA’s Climate Program Office announced today that it is investing $4.5 million in four projects to test technology designed to improve the Tropical Pacific Observing System, an array of buoys in the tropical Pacific used to better understand El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), how it develops, and how it affects Earth’s weather.

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Monday, April 11, 2016

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Tornados are one of nature’s most destructive forces. Currently, our capacity to predict tornados and other severe weather risks does not extend beyond seven days. In a recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists with NOAA and the University of Miami identified how patterns in the spring phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), coupled with variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, could help predict U.S. regional tornado outbreaks. 

NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

Friday, February 5, 2016

NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

NOAA scientists and partners have embarked on a land, sea, and air campaign in the tropical Pacific to study the current El Niño and gather data in an effort to improve weather forecasts thousands of miles away.
Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

Scientists from NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environment Canada have issued a six-month forecast for water levels to be at or above average on Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie into spring of 2016. Lake Ontario water levels are expected to remain close to monthly averages. However, the impacts of the anticipated strong El Niño and other atmospheric anomalies on the forecast are difficult to predict.
What does “normal” mean anyway?

Monday, May 4, 2015

What does “normal” mean anyway?

In the Great Lakes region, memories of the brutal winter of 2013-2014 are still fresh in residents’ minds. That winter brought very cold surface water temperatures and high ice cover well into the 2014 spring. Coupled with a record-setting water level surge of nearly three feet between January 2013 and December 2014, people who live along the shore of Lake Michigan have been wondering whether this is the “new normal” for the lake.
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