Saturday, October 21, 2017
 

The spirit of collaboration aboard Gulf of Mexico cruise

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This summer, NOAA and partner scientists will conduct their most collaborative ocean acidification sampling of the Gulf of Mexico yet. Set to depart today, July 18

th, the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) will travel through international waters with 24 scientists from the United States, Mexico and Cuba on board.

Summer of sailing drones

Unmanned ocean vehicles are collecting data from the Arctic to the tropics

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Over the next four months, NOAA scientists will launch unmanned ocean vehicles, called Saildrones, from the Arctic to the tropical Pacific Ocean to help better understand how changes in the ocean are affecting weather, climate, fisheries and marine mammals. The wind and solar-powered research vehicles that resemble a sailboat will travel thousands of miles across the ocean, reaching some areas never before surveyed with such specialized technology. 

Meet Désirée Tommasi: Pioneer in new field of fish forecasting

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Long known for weather forecasting and climate prediction, NOAA is pioneering a new type of forecasting -- fish forecasting.  Meet Désirée Tommasi, Ph.D., a young oceanographer working at  NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, N.J. who has just published research about forecasting the Pacific sardine, one of the nation’s most storied fish, made famous by John Steinbeck’s Cannery Row.

New tool helps oyster growers prepare for changing ocean chemistry

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For Bill Mook, coastal acidification is one thing his oyster hatchery cannot afford to ignore.

He teamed up with fisherman-turned-oceanographer Joe Salisbury of the University of New Hampshire to adapt and install a new tool to help shellfish growers better prepare for ocean acidification.

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