Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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Climate model shows Australia’s rainfall decline due to human-caused...

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Climate model shows Australia’s rainfall decline due to human-caused...

NOAA scientists have developed a new high-resolution climate model that shows southwestern Australia’s long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in manmade greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion, according to research published today in Nature Geoscience.

Greenhouse gases top 400 ppm for three months in a row at Mauna Loa

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Greenhouse gases top 400 ppm for three months in a row at Mauna Loa

For the first time since carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been measured, the levels of this greenhouse gas at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, have been above 400 parts per million every single day for three straight months.

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William...

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William...

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 

Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Ian Enochs, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami, traveled in May to the Island of Maug in the Pacific Ocean as part of a NOAA expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to study coral reef ecosystems. We caught up with Enochs to learn about his research on underwater vents that seep carbon dioxide into the Pacific.

Tropical cyclone ‘maximum intensity’ is shifting toward the poles

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Tropical cyclone ‘maximum intensity’ is shifting toward the poles

Over the past 30 years, the location where tropical cyclones reach maximum intensity has been shifting toward the poles in both the northern and southern hemispheres at a rate of about 35 miles, or one-half a degree of latitude, per decade according to a new study, The Poleward Migration of the Location of Tropical Cyclone Maximum Intensity, published tomorrow in Nature.

 

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