Monday, November 24, 2014
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Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year

The Antarctic ozone hole, which forms annually in the August to October period, reached its peak size on September 11, stretching to 9.3 million square miles (24.1 million square kilometers), roughly the same size as last year’s peak of 9.3 million square miles (24 million square kilometers) on September 16, 2013. This is an area similar in size to North America.

NOAA study shows pattern of fewer days with tornadoes, but more...

Thursday, October 16, 2014

NOAA study shows pattern of fewer days with tornadoes, but more...

Are tornadoes increasing? Not really, the number has remained relatively constant. What is changing is that there are fewer days with tornadoes each year, but on those days there are more tornadoes, according to a NOAA report published today in the journal Science.
NOAA Sea Grant Awards $15.9 million for projects to build resilient...

Wednesday, October 08, 2014

NOAA Sea Grant Awards $15.9 million for projects to build resilient...

NOAA Sea Grant announced today grants totaling $15.9 million to support over 300 projects around the nation that help build resilient coastal communities and economies. Through university, state and other partnerships, Sea Grant Programs will supplement the federal funding with an additional $7.9 million in non-federal matching funds, bringing the total investment to more than $23.8 million.

 

Deep Argo will help unlock mystery of deep ocean effects on climate

Monday, October 06, 2014

Deep Argo will help unlock mystery of deep ocean effects on climate

Gregory C. Johnson, a NOAA oceanographer at the Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, and John M. Lyman, an oceanographer at NOAA’s cooperative institute with the University of Hawaii, the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, have written an essay published online in Nature Climate Change about how a new international program can help fill a major gap in information about the heat in the deep ocean. We caught up with Johnson to learn more.

NOAA flies over Arctic to measure extent of sea ice

Friday, October 03, 2014

NOAA flies over Arctic to measure extent of sea ice

NOAA researchers set out this week on a two-week mission to fly over the Arctic to measure how much the ice has melted over the summer and gauge the speed of this fall’s refreezing of sea ice. This is the second year in a row scientists have flown above Arctic waters.  Data gathered from both years is testing a hypothesis that increased summer heat stored in the newly sea-ice free areas of the Arctic Ocean lead to surface heat fluxes in autumn that are large enough to have impacts on atmospheric temperature, humidity, wind and cloud distributions. 

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