Saturday, December 10, 2016
 
NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail...

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail...

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.


Scientists test a new tool to improve local precipitation forecasts

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Scientists test a new tool to improve local precipitation forecasts

A new weather forecasting tool could soon find itself part of the day-to-day operations of NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS).

The instrument, called Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, or AERI, measures temperature, water vapor and trace gases (like ozone, carbon monoxide and methane) in the lowest layer of Earth’s atmosphere, the troposphere. Now, an AERI project led by Tim Wagner, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, has received funding through NOAA’s Joint Technology Transfer Program.

Study shows ocean acidification is two-front assault on coral reefs

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Study shows ocean acidification is two-front assault on coral reefs

Scientists studying coral reefs in volcanically acidified water of the southwestern Pacific Ocean measured a net loss of coral reef skeletons due to increased bio-erosion, according to new research by NOAA, the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) and Australian scientists. 

NOAA Research grants support continued tornado research in the Southeast

Monday, October 31, 2016

NOAA Research grants support continued tornado research in the Southeast

A study of tornadoes in the southeastern United States begins its second year this month as NOAA Research announces awards of $2.5 million in grants presented to partner institutions.
Q&A: Is Arctic warming fueling severe winter weather in the mid-latitudes?

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Q&A: Is Arctic warming fueling severe winter weather in the mid-latitudes?

We caught up with James Overland, oceanographer at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Lab, to hear about his latest research on whether Arctic warming is fueling more severe winter weather in the mid-latitudes, the temperate zone of the Earth between the tropics and the Arctic, and the part of the United States where most Americans live.

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