Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Meet Désirée Tommasi: Pioneer in new field of fish forecasting

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Meet Désirée Tommasi: Pioneer in new field of fish forecasting

Long known for weather forecasting and climate prediction, NOAA is pioneering a new type of forecasting -- fish forecasting.  Meet Désirée Tommasi, Ph.D., a young oceanographer working at  NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, N.J. who has just published research about forecasting the Pacific sardine, one of the nation’s most storied fish, made famous by John Steinbeck’s Cannery Row.

Morgan, Nick

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Morgan, Nick

Going to the Ends of the Earth for Science

Late March is a pivotal time around the globe. It marks the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, and the coming of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. In Antarctica, it’s when the sun drops below the horizon, not to rise again until the following September. NOAA researchers at the South Pole Observing Station continue their work through the long Antarctic night.
Neely, Ryan

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Neely, Ryan

Putting A Laser Focus on Climate Change

A physical scientist for NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Ryan Neely uses light detection and ranging (lidar) to study the relationship between particles in the stratosphere and climate.

New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

NOAA and partners also examine ecosystem changes on sea birds and marine mammals

Bering Sea marine mammals, birds, and fish are shifting where they eat, bear their young, and make their homes in response to changes in sea ice extent and duration.

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

Friday, June 21, 2013

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

This month, NOAA launched a 1½-year long pilot study in North Carolina to improve understanding and forecasting of dangerous storms that can lead to flooding and economic losses. From the coastline to the mountains, state-of-the-art NOAA instrumentation is being set up in numerous locations across the state that may improve forecasting and lead-time for tropical storms and summertime thunderstorms.
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