Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
Encouraging information from this year’s observations of the Antarctic ozone hole

Monday, October 21, 2013

Encouraging information from this year’s observations of the Antarctic ozone hole

For nearly 50 years, scientists with NOAA have launched high-altitude balloons from the South Pole, to understand why a hole was forming in the protective ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Now, organizations around the world track the infamous ozone hole through these ballon-sondes, satellite measurements and ground instruments.
Fishing in the Arctic?

Friday, September 8, 2017

Fishing in the Arctic?

Dispatches from the Arctic

Editor’s note: This is the fourth dispatch from Jeremy Mathis, director of NOAA’s Arctic Research Program, who is leading a team of NOAA scientists on a research cruise in the Arctic.

GFDL Internships Support NOAA, Community Diversity Efforts

Thursday, September 26, 2013

GFDL Internships Support NOAA, Community Diversity Efforts

This summer, NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) hosted 10 interns, ranging from a high school senior to graduate students well on their way to their Ph.D. degrees. Each intern conducted research relevant to GFDL’s climate-science mission, and most presented their findings at GFDL and at their home institutions.

Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

NOAA and Army Corps issue forecast, consider El Niño potential impact

Scientists from NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environment Canada have issued a six-month forecast for water levels to be at or above average on Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie into spring of 2016. Lake Ontario water levels are expected to remain close to monthly averages. However, the impacts of the anticipated strong El Niño and other atmospheric anomalies on the forecast are difficult to predict.
Greenhouse gases continue climbing; 2012 a record year

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Greenhouse gases continue climbing; 2012 a record year

NOAA’s updated Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), which measures the direct climate influence of many heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide and methane, shows 2012 continued the steady upward trend that began with the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s.  Last year, CO2 at the peak of its cycle reached 400 ppm for one month at all eight Arctic sites for the first time.
12345678910Last

Latest Profiles

Connect with Research.NOAA.gov

Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Headquarters

1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301-713-2458