Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Since Katrina: A decade of NOAA hurricane research

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Since Katrina: A decade of NOAA hurricane research

Advancing hurricane forecasting, improving models, and increasing observations

A decade ago, the United States experienced one of the most active and destructive hurricane seasons ever recorded. The loss of life and destruction of property from Hurricanes Katrina (Aug. 29), Rita (Sept. 24), and Wilma (Oct. 24) drove NOAA to re-evaluate hurricane research and severe storm preparedness.

Southern Ocean's role in climate, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Southern Ocean's role in climate, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant

NOAA joins with Princeton and other institutions in six-year study to help public better understand Southern Ocean

The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth's temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet's excess heat. Yet, the inner workings — and global importance — of this ocean that accounts for 30 percent of the world's ocean area remains relatively unknown to scientists, as observations remain hindered by dangerous seas.

Stock, Charles

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Stock, Charles

Laying the groundwork for understanding climate impacts today and centuries from now

“Climate scientists call me the fish guy and fisheries scientists call me the climate guy,” jokes Charles “Charlie” Stock, research oceanographer and modeler, at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL).

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

Summer of research to improve hurricane forecasting

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Summer of research to improve hurricane forecasting

Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 helps support research to improve severe weather forecasting

This summer, NOAA scientists and partners are launching a number of new unmanned aircraft and water vehicles to collect weather information as part of a coordinated effort to improve hurricane forecasts.  

Several of these research projects and other NOAA led efforts to improve hurricane forecasting were made possible, in part, because of the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013. The act was passed by Congress and signed by the President in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. It provides $60 billion in funding to multiple agencies for disaster relief. NOAA received $309.7 million to provide technical assistance to those states with coastal and fishery impacts from Sandy, and to improve weather forecasting and weather research and predictive capability to help future preparation, response and recovery from similar events.

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