Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
Mystery solved: "Extra” methane in LA's air traced to fossil-fuel sources

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Mystery solved: "Extra” methane in LA's air traced to fossil-fuel sources

A new study, led by NOAA and its Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, used a novel approach to trace methane in the Los Angeles basin back to its sources, and found that "extra" methane is likely coming from sources related to fossil fuels.

Neely, Ryan

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Neely, Ryan

Putting A Laser Focus on Climate Change

A physical scientist for NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Ryan Neely uses light detection and ranging (lidar) to study the relationship between particles in the stratosphere and climate.

Never Missing an Opportunity, Ship of Opportunity That Is, to Collect Carbon Dioxide Data

Monday, August 11, 2014

Never Missing an Opportunity, Ship of Opportunity That Is, to Collect Carbon Dioxide Data

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the words carbon dioxide? Is it the ocean? In this day and age, it should be. The ocean absorbs about one fourth of the extra carbon dioxide in the air that is released through human activity, according to a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

NOAA and partners also examine ecosystem changes on sea birds and marine mammals

Bering Sea marine mammals, birds, and fish are shifting where they eat, bear their young, and make their homes in response to changes in sea ice extent and duration.

New mission for the Global Hawk

Thursday, September 11, 2014

New mission for the Global Hawk

NOAA is testing data collected by unmanned aircraft to improve weather forecast operations

For the last five years, NOAA has teamed up with NASA to fly NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft to get an inside look at how hurricanes form and intensify over the Atlantic. The NASA-led project called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission is demonstrating the ability of the Global Hawk to fly over hurricanes to gather continuous weather data on flights that are longer in duration than possible with manned aircraft. In the next three years, NOAA will take the next step with the Global Hawk, leading a new experiment and continuing its important collaboration with NASA. Drawing on technology and expertise honed in the current mission, NOAA will assess the feasibility of regular operations of Global Hawk to improve day-to-day forecasts of severe storms forming over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

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