Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

Refining ethanol may release more of some pollutants than burning it in vehicles

After quantifying the airborne emissions from the nation’s third largest ethanol refinery, a team led by NOAA and University of ColoradoBoulder researchers has found that for some gases, refining ethanol releases more to the atmosphere than previously thought—and in some cases more than is ultimately released by burning the fuel in vehicles. The emissions can contribute to the formation of ozone, a regulated pollutant that can affect human health. Results are published in a paper published online by Journal of Geophysical Research.

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

NOAA helps lead latest analysis of Earth's protective shield

Nearly 30 years after the protections of the Montreal Protocol were put into place, there’s more evidence that the international agreement to protect Earth’s ozone layer is working, according to a new scientific report released today at the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why

Ground-level ozone, also known as smog, has climbed in the rural West over the past 25 years, even in such seemingly pristine places as Yellowstone National Park. Now, scientists may have found out why – and why cutting our own output of smog-forming chemicals such as nitrogen oxide hasn’t helped.
Ryerson, Tom

Monday, March 14, 2011

Ryerson, Tom

On the Wing – and in the Lab – for NOAA Chemist Works to Clear Up Questions about Air Pollution

A research chemist with the NOAA Chemical Sciences Division in Boulder, Colorado, Tom Ryerson has participated in field projects on research aircraft, including the NOAA WP-3Ds, since 1995.

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

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