Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
NOAA: Carbon dioxide levels reach milestone at Arctic sites

Thursday, May 31, 2012

NOAA: Carbon dioxide levels reach milestone at Arctic sites

NOAA cooperative measurements in remote, northern sites hit greenhouse gas milestone in April

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Barrow, Alaska, has reached a new milestone this spring, according to NOAA measurements.

Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

Monday, June 20, 2016

Q&A: What do Arctic ice and Atlantic hurricanes have in common?

New research examines the North Atlantic Oscillation and its influence on global weather

The journal Nature Geoscience published a paper by Tom Delworth and his colleagues examining how a natural atmospheric force--the North Atlantic Oscillation--may be changing ocean currents in the North Atlantic. Among other impacts, the stronger ocean currents increase the amount of heat flowing toward polar areas, which could speed up Arctic ice melt and affect how hurricanes form. We asked Delworth a few questions about his study:

Recording climate change from the top of the world

Monday, August 31, 2015

Recording climate change from the top of the world

Barrow reports record-breaking 2015 Spring warming

Spring came early this year, breaking several records at the top of the world in Barrow, Alaska, according to a new report that combines observations from NOAA, the North Slope Borough and a scientist who has tracked an Arctic bird for the last four decades.

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

It is too soon to know if recent extreme cold weather such as the last two East Coast winters are linked to Arctic climate warming, according to new research published in the Journal of Climate by James Overland of NOAA, and other authors from North America, Asia and Europe.

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Research shows ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the Arctic

Communities dependent on shellfish, other marine resources could be at risk

Ocean acidification is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, potentially affecting shellfish, other marine species in the food web, and communities that depend on these resources, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by NOAA, Chinese marine scientists and other partners.


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