Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
Colorado report: climate change projected to reduce water in streams, increase water needs for crops, cities

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Colorado report: climate change projected to reduce water in streams, increase water needs for crops, cities

Rising temperatures will tend to reduce the amount of water in many of Colorado’s streams and rivers, melt mountain snowpack earlier in the spring, and increase the water needed by thirsty crops and cities, according to the new report, “Climate Change in Colorado: A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation,” which updates and expands upon an initial report released in 2008.

De Boer, Gijs

Thursday, March 31, 2016

De Boer, Gijs

NOAA scientist wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic

NOAA/CIRES scientist Gijs de Boer wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic. “I love being part of the UAV revolution,” says de Boer.

Decades of research on Great Lakes ice cover reveal trends

Friday, March 9, 2012

Decades of research on Great Lakes ice cover reveal trends

NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab has monitored ice cover on the lakes for decades. Its measurements have documented wide variations from winter to winter and made possible discoveries about climate links to variation in ice cover.

Designing the climate observing system of the future

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Designing the climate observing system of the future

A new study suggests that targeted investments in expanding climate observing systems could return trillions of dollars in benefits in the decades to come. 

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Monday, August 12, 2013

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.
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