Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
New mission for the Global Hawk

Thursday, September 11, 2014

New mission for the Global Hawk

NOAA is testing data collected by unmanned aircraft to improve weather forecast operations

For the last five years, NOAA has teamed up with NASA to fly NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft to get an inside look at how hurricanes form and intensify over the Atlantic. The NASA-led project called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission is demonstrating the ability of the Global Hawk to fly over hurricanes to gather continuous weather data on flights that are longer in duration than possible with manned aircraft. In the next three years, NOAA will take the next step with the Global Hawk, leading a new experiment and continuing its important collaboration with NASA. Drawing on technology and expertise honed in the current mission, NOAA will assess the feasibility of regular operations of Global Hawk to improve day-to-day forecasts of severe storms forming over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

New NOAA awards to fund studies of weather warnings, social media, Internet tools and public response

Monday, August 27, 2012

New NOAA awards to fund studies of weather warnings, social media, Internet tools and public response

How do people sift important weather information out of the incessant buzz of 24/7 social media, text messages, smart phone alerts, and overflowing email inboxes? Four new research awards funded by NOAA seek to answer this question.

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

Friday, June 21, 2013

New NOAA study in North Carolina may improve forecasting, lead times for dangerous storms

This month, NOAA launched a 1½-year long pilot study in North Carolina to improve understanding and forecasting of dangerous storms that can lead to flooding and economic losses. From the coastline to the mountains, state-of-the-art NOAA instrumentation is being set up in numerous locations across the state that may improve forecasting and lead-time for tropical storms and summertime thunderstorms.
New study: Pace of climate zone shifts quickens as climate warms

Monday, April 22, 2013

New study: Pace of climate zone shifts quickens as climate warms

As our planet is warming, not only have Earth’s climate zones begun to shift – the pace of change is expected to accelerate, according to a new study led by the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado.

New study: Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City’s water supply

Friday, November 1, 2013

New study: Rising temperatures challenge Salt Lake City’s water supply

Sensitivity study helps the city, others in the Intermountain West, plan for the future

In an example of the challenges water-strapped Western cities will face in a warming world, new research shows that every degree Fahrenheit of warming in the Salt Lake City region could mean a 1.8 to 6.5 percent drop in the annual flow of streams that provide water to the city. 
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