Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

NOAA research links human-caused CO2 emissions to dissolving sea snail shells off U.S. West Coast

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods.


NOAA Researchers Honored for Outstanding Scientific Publications

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

NOAA Researchers Honored for Outstanding Scientific Publications

2010 Awards Presented to 21 Scientists

Twenty-one researchers have received 2010 Outstanding Scientific Paper Awards from NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research for discoveries that are expected to help improve weather forecasting and further understanding of climate change and ozone depletion. 
NOAA, partners: Earth’s oceans and ecosystems still absorbing about half the greenhouse gases emitted by people

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

NOAA, partners: Earth’s oceans and ecosystems still absorbing about half the greenhouse gases emitted by people

Earth’s oceans, forests and other ecosystems continue to soak up about half the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere by human activities, even as those emissions have increased, according to a study by University of Colorado and NOAA scientists published today in the journal Nature.

NOAA: Carbon dioxide levels reach milestone at Arctic sites

Thursday, May 31, 2012

NOAA: Carbon dioxide levels reach milestone at Arctic sites

NOAA cooperative measurements in remote, northern sites hit greenhouse gas milestone in April

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Barrow, Alaska, has reached a new milestone this spring, according to NOAA measurements.

NOAA-led research identifies areas of global ocean  most vulnerable to ocean acidification

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

NOAA-led research identifies areas of global ocean most vulnerable to ocean acidification

New NOAA-led research maps the distribution of aragonite saturation state in both surface and subsurface waters of the global ocean and provides further evidence that ocean acidification is happening on a global scale. The study identifies the Arctic and Antarctic oceans, and the upwelling ocean waters off the west coasts of North America, South America and Africa as regions that are especially vulnerable to ocean acidification.
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