Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Introducing EMILY and other innovations to improve hurricane forecasts

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Introducing EMILY and other innovations to improve hurricane forecasts

2012 Hurricane Research News Briefs

NOAA researchers will be using several innovative tools, techniques, and research results during the 2012 hurricane season to continue to improve hurricane forecasting. Read our 2012 hurricane research news briefs to learn more.

Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, according to a new study. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or “snouts,” of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast.
Los Angeles air pollution declining, losing its sting

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Los Angeles air pollution declining, losing its sting

The cleanup of California’s tailpipe emissions over the last few decades has not only reduced ozone pollution in the Los Angeles area, it has also altered the pollution chemistry in the atmosphere, making the eye-stinging “organic nitrate” component of air pollution plummet, according to a new study.

Magnifying Smoke

Monday, August 27, 2012

Magnifying Smoke

NOAA instrument uncovers first direct evidence of “lensing,” other heat-trapping effects of wildfire smoke particles

A new study directly measures the heat-trapping effect of wildfires during an actual wildfire that burned near Boulder, Colo., in 2010.

Methane leaks from three large U.S. natural gas fields in line with federal estimates

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Methane leaks from three large U.S. natural gas fields in line with federal estimates

Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, NOAA researchers, colleagues measure lower emissions of the greenhouse gas than some other sites

Tens of thousands of pounds of methane leak per hour from equipment in three major natural gas basins that span Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and Pennsylvania, according to airborne measurements published today by a NOAA-led team of scientists. But the overall leak rate from those basins is only about one percent of gas production there—lower than leak rates measured in other gas fields, and in line with federal estimates.

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