Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Climate change not to blame for 2013 Colorado floods

Monday, September 29, 2014

Climate change not to blame for 2013 Colorado floods

Heavy multi-day summer rain events not expected to increase in the area

Last September’s widespread flooding in northeast Colorado, which saw just over 17 inches of rain in one week in the city of Boulder, was not made more likely or more intense by the effects of human-induced climate change, according to a new NOAA-led study published today in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

 

Climate change to shift global pattern of mild weather

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Climate change to shift global pattern of mild weather

New research shows the global average of mild weather days will drop, with dramatic declines for some, increases for others

As scientists work to predict how climate change may affect hurricanes, droughts, floods, blizzards and other severe weather, there’s one area that’s been overlooked: mild weather. But no more.

Climate model shows Australia’s rainfall decline due to human-caused climate change

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Climate model shows Australia’s rainfall decline due to human-caused climate change

New climate model will help improve regional climate predictions in U.S.

NOAA scientists have developed a new high-resolution climate model that shows southwestern Australia’s long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in manmade greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion, according to research published today in Nature Geoscience.

Climate models show carbon emission mitigation could slow Arctic temperature increases

Monday, January 27, 2014

Climate models show carbon emission mitigation could slow Arctic temperature increases

NOAA-led research using climate model projections concludes the Arctic climate will continue to show major changes over the next decades, but that carbon emission mitigation could slow temperature changes in the second half of the century, according to a paper published by AGU’s Earth’s Future.
Colorado mountain hail may disappear in a warmer future

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Colorado mountain hail may disappear in a warmer future

NOAA-led study shows less hail, more rain in region’s future, with possible increase in flood risk

Summertime hail could all but disappear from the eastern flank of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains by 2070, according to a new modeling study by scientists from NOAA and several other institutions.
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