Wednesday, November 22, 2017
 
Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

Monday, July 1, 2013

Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people. Increasing demand for that water combined with reduced flow and the looming threat of climate change have prompted concern about how to manage the basin’s water in coming decades. NOAA-funded researchers at the University of Washington and co-authors at eight institutions across the West aim to explain this wide range, and provide policymakers and the public with a framework for comparison.

Colorado’s governor awards scientists for air quality work during Gulf oil spill

Friday, October 5, 2012

Colorado’s governor awards scientists for air quality work during Gulf oil spill

A team of scientists from NOAA and the University of Colorado-CIRES will receive the governor’s Award for High-Impact Research for discoveries made during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill crisis.

Drifting Buoys Track Water Currents in the Great Lakes Straits of Mackinac

Friday, July 27, 2012

Drifting Buoys Track Water Currents in the Great Lakes Straits of Mackinac

When you’re watching a river or the waves on a lake, do you ever wonder where that water goes? If you threw a rubber ducky into the water, where would it end up? Scientists are studying the movement of water in the Straits of Mackinac, which connect Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, to figure out how the water moves around. This water movement can affect ship traffic, how pollution spreads, and where aquatic animals go.

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Monday, August 12, 2013

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.
Encouraging information from this year’s observations of the Antarctic ozone hole

Monday, October 21, 2013

Encouraging information from this year’s observations of the Antarctic ozone hole

For nearly 50 years, scientists with NOAA have launched high-altitude balloons from the South Pole, to understand why a hole was forming in the protective ozone layer high in the atmosphere. Now, organizations around the world track the infamous ozone hole through these ballon-sondes, satellite measurements and ground instruments.
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