Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

New Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries

NOAA and partners also examine ecosystem changes on sea birds and marine mammals

Bering Sea marine mammals, birds, and fish are shifting where they eat, bear their young, and make their homes in response to changes in sea ice extent and duration.

New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

Monday, December 22, 2014

New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New research published in Marine Policy from the first Alaska-focused study on public understanding and awareness of ocean acidification risk shows that Alaskans are three times more aware of ocean acidification than Americans in general.  However, Alaskans have difficulty seeing ocean acidification as an immediate risk, and the direct risks to Alaska’s fisheries are still not well understood. The research, “Gauging perceptions of ocean acidification in Alaska,” can be read online.


New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species

Monday, June 15, 2015

New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species

Chukchi and Beaufort Seas could become less hospitable to shelled animals by 2030

New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044.

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

New unmanned tools used to track effects of melting glaciers

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 

NOAA contributes key carbon dioxide data to global carbon assessment

Thursday, September 25, 2014

NOAA contributes key carbon dioxide data to global carbon assessment

This year’s report has improved ocean carbon dioxide measurements

A global report released this week on changing carbon dioxide levels in Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land environment draws heavily from data and observations by NOAA research scientists and their partners. For the first time, the annual assessment by the Global Carbon Project uses data obtained from autonomous instruments installed by NOAA scientists on its ships and other ships of opportunity and moorings to determine the variability of  carbon dioxide in the surface ocean. 

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