Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

NOAA releases free downloadable flat screen program, great for students, teachers and science lovers

(September 1) Today NOAA released a free, downloadable flat screen version of its popular Science On a Sphere® (SOS), SOS ExplorerTM. This new way to display the dynamics of Earth’s weather and climate, plate tectonics and more will help teachers bring these stunning science visualizations, usually found at museums and science centers, into the classroom, where students can learn by exploring.


Ozone treaty taking a bite out of US greenhouse gas emissions

Monday, August 14, 2017

Ozone treaty taking a bite out of US greenhouse gas emissions

The Montreal Protocol, the international treaty adopted to restore Earth’s protective ozone layer, has had a major side benefit - reducing climate-altering greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S.

Recording climate change from the top of the world

Monday, August 31, 2015

Recording climate change from the top of the world

Barrow reports record-breaking 2015 Spring warming

Spring came early this year, breaking several records at the top of the world in Barrow, Alaska, according to a new report that combines observations from NOAA, the North Slope Borough and a scientist who has tracked an Arctic bird for the last four decades.

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

NOAA helps lead latest analysis of Earth's protective shield

Nearly 30 years after the protections of the Montreal Protocol were put into place, there’s more evidence that the international agreement to protect Earth’s ozone layer is working, according to a new scientific report released today at the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Rivers in the sky

Friday, January 16, 2015

Rivers in the sky

Yes, there are rivers in the sky!  Atmospheric rivers, to be exact, are narrow bands of moisture that regularly form above the Pacific Ocean and flow towards North America’s west coast, drenching it in rain and packing it with snow.   These rivers, which transport more water than the Amazon or the Mississippi, have a far-reaching impact - even on the food you may be eating today.

With this week’s  January 14 sailing of NOAA’s largest ship, the Ronald H. Brown, a major investigation of atmospheric rivers named CalWater 2015 is now underway.

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