Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
New study: U.S. power plant emissions down

Thursday, January 9, 2014

New study: U.S. power plant emissions down

CIRES, NOAA scientists find switch to natural gas power plants means fewer air pollutants

Power plants that use natural gas and a new technology to squeeze more energy from the fuel release far less of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide than coal-fired power plants do, according to a new analysis accepted for publication Jan. 8 in the journal Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The so-called “combined cycle” natural gas power plants also release significantly less nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, which can worsen air quality.
NOAA-led study: Colorado oil and gas wells emit more pollutants than expected

Monday, February 27, 2012

NOAA-led study: Colorado oil and gas wells emit more pollutants than expected

When NOAA scientists began routinely monitoring the atmosphere’s composition at a tower north of Denver a few years ago, their instruments immediately sniffed something strange: plumes of air rich with chemical pollutants including the potent greenhouse gas methane.

Phillips, Joe

Monday, March 10, 2014

Phillips, Joe

Monitoring Air at the South Pole with NOAA Corps

NOAA Corps Officer Joe Phillips is currently a Station Chief for the Amundsen-Scott Station at the South Pole. The following interview explains his current role and the various exciting assignments he's had along the way. 
Pushing the boundaries of research at NOAA in the sky

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Pushing the boundaries of research at NOAA in the sky

Part one of a two-part series on innovative and emerging projects supported by NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Taking risks is a necessary part of advancing science. NOAA recognizes the need to invest in these emerging research areas and recently supported several inventive and high-risk projects.
Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Quantifying the emissions from a large ethanol refinery

Refining ethanol may release more of some pollutants than burning it in vehicles

After quantifying the airborne emissions from the nation’s third largest ethanol refinery, a team led by NOAA and University of ColoradoBoulder researchers has found that for some gases, refining ethanol releases more to the atmosphere than previously thought—and in some cases more than is ultimately released by burning the fuel in vehicles. The emissions can contribute to the formation of ozone, a regulated pollutant that can affect human health. Results are published in a paper published online by Journal of Geophysical Research.

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