Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
NOAA Seeks Answers to Great Lakes Water Level Changes

Thursday, March 6, 2014

NOAA Seeks Answers to Great Lakes Water Level Changes

Understanding causes helps water managers, planners and overall economy

While people along our nation’s coast experience rising sea levels, residents along the Great Lakes – the Earth’s largest lake system – are adapting to the opposite problem: chronic low water levels and a receding shoreline.

In a perspective now running in Science magazine, Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist at NOAA’s Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, says “the record low water levels in Lake Michigan-Huron in the winter of 2012 to 2013 raise important questions about the driving forces behind water level fluctuations and how water resource management planning decisions can be improved.” 

NOAA, NASA: Antarctic ozone hole second smallest in 20 years

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

NOAA, NASA: Antarctic ozone hole second smallest in 20 years

Warmer air temperatures high above the Antarctic led to the second smallest seasonal ozone hole in 20 years, according to NOAA and NASA satellite measurements

NOAA, National Archives team up with citizen-scientists to reconstruct historical climate of the Arctic

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

NOAA, National Archives team up with citizen-scientists to reconstruct historical climate of the Arctic

Before satellites, weather data transmitters, or computers, there were the ship's logs of Arctic sea voyages. A new crowdsourcing effort could make the weather data from these ship logs available to climate scientists worldwide.

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Report: telltale signs that ozone layer is recovering

NOAA helps lead latest analysis of Earth's protective shield

Nearly 30 years after the protections of the Montreal Protocol were put into place, there’s more evidence that the international agreement to protect Earth’s ozone layer is working, according to a new scientific report released today at the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Round-the-world sailors help NOAA gather data in Southern Ocean to improve forecasts

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Round-the-world sailors help NOAA gather data in Southern Ocean to improve forecasts

NOAA’s Drifter program will catch a lift with Volvo Ocean Race

If you’ve ever sailed aboard a ship in the ocean, or checked a weather report before heading to the beach, then you are one of many millions of people who benefit from ocean observations. NOAA collects ocean observations and weather data to provide mariners with accurate forecasts of seas, coastal weather forecasts and regional climate predictions. Partnerships are essential to maintaining a network of free-floating, data-gathering buoys known as drifters. NOAA’s latest partner is not your typical research or ocean transportation vessel: the six sailboats and crew currently racing around the world in the Volvo Ocean Race.

 

12345

Latest Profiles

Connect with Research.NOAA.gov

Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Headquarters

1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301-713-2458