Wednesday, November 22, 2017
 
Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

Carbon dioxide levels race past troubling milestone

Monday, October 3, 2016

Carbon dioxide levels race past troubling milestone

Relentless rise of this greenhouse gas locks in a warmer future, scientists say

Carbon dioxide  levels in the Earth’s atmosphere passed a troubling milestone for good this summer, locking in levels of the heat-trapping gas not seen for millions of years.


Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

Monday, July 1, 2013

Clearing up confusion on future of Colorado River flows

The Colorado River provides water for more than 30 million people. Increasing demand for that water combined with reduced flow and the looming threat of climate change have prompted concern about how to manage the basin’s water in coming decades. NOAA-funded researchers at the University of Washington and co-authors at eight institutions across the West aim to explain this wide range, and provide policymakers and the public with a framework for comparison.

Climate change in your county: Plan ahead with a new NOAA tool

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Climate change in your county: Plan ahead with a new NOAA tool

Residents, communities and businesses now have easy access to climate projections, through a few easy keystrokes, for every county in the contiguous United States.  


Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at least 40 percent

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at least 40 percent

NOAA and partners conduct rapid assessment of devastating August rains

Human-caused climate warming increased the chances of the torrential rains that unleashed devastating floods in south Louisiana in mid August by at least 40 percent, according to a team of NOAA and partner scientists with World Weather Attribution (WWA) who conducted a rapid assessment of the role of climate on the historic heavy rain event. 

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