Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
Clearing up a cloudy view of phytoplankton's role in the climate system

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Clearing up a cloudy view of phytoplankton's role in the climate system

Phytoplankton - tiny plant-like organisms drifting through the great, vast ocean - are barely visible to the naked eye, and some are visible only through a microscope. Yet, when they are thriving, it is possible to see them from as far away as space. Their location is marked by swirling patterns of bright blues and greens that give the ocean a slick, marbled appearance, like oil on water.


Dumas, Ed

Monday, April 11, 2016

Dumas, Ed

Flying research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather

Ed Dumas flies research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather. He designs data sensors and data acquisition software for these manned and unmanned aircraft for NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 
Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Monday, August 12, 2013

Earth is breathing deeper: Multi-agency study reveals widening seasonal swings in CO2 in the Northern Hemisphere

Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise and fall annually as plants take up the gas in spring and summer and release it in fall and winter through photosynthesis and respiration. Now the range of that cycle is growing as more CO2 is emitted from the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities, according to a study published in Science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, with CIRES and NOAA co-authors.
Manzello, Derek

Monday, January 27, 2014

Manzello, Derek

Diving into coral reef chemistry

As the lead principal investigator of the Coral Reef Monitoring Program and Ocean Acidification Program, Derek Manzello, PhD, studies the impacts of ocean acidification on reefs from a variety of ocean sites over time.
Morgan, Nick

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Morgan, Nick

Going to the Ends of the Earth for Science

Late March is a pivotal time around the globe. It marks the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, and the coming of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere. In Antarctica, it’s when the sun drops below the horizon, not to rise again until the following September. NOAA researchers at the South Pole Observing Station continue their work through the long Antarctic night.
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