Saturday, November 18, 2017
 
De Boer, Gijs

Thursday, March 31, 2016

De Boer, Gijs

NOAA scientist wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic

NOAA/CIRES scientist Gijs de Boer wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic. “I love being part of the UAV revolution,” says de Boer.

Dumas, Ed

Monday, April 11, 2016

Dumas, Ed

Flying research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather

Ed Dumas flies research drones and aircraft to collect data on climate change and extreme weather. He designs data sensors and data acquisition software for these manned and unmanned aircraft for NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 
Fishing in the Arctic?

Friday, September 8, 2017

Fishing in the Arctic?

Dispatches from the Arctic

Editor’s note: This is the fourth dispatch from Jeremy Mathis, director of NOAA’s Arctic Research Program, who is leading a team of NOAA scientists on a research cruise in the Arctic.

For the first time, Saildrones explore the Bering Sea

Sunday, April 19, 2015

For the first time, Saildrones explore the Bering Sea

On April 22, two autonomous surface vehicles equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors will be released for the first time in the Bering Sea by NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL). Saildrones have the capacity to increase observational infrastructure in remote and hostile polar regions where ship time and human labor is costly and potentially hazardous. The ongoing development of Saildrones is a collaborative effort of researchers at PMEL, the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) at the University of Washington, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Saildrone Inc.
Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Like butter: Study explains surprising acceleration of Greenland’s inland ice

Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, according to a new study. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or “snouts,” of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast.
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