Wednesday, November 22, 2017
 
Introducing EMILY and other innovations to improve hurricane forecasts

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Introducing EMILY and other innovations to improve hurricane forecasts

2012 Hurricane Research News Briefs

NOAA researchers will be using several innovative tools, techniques, and research results during the 2012 hurricane season to continue to improve hurricane forecasting. Read our 2012 hurricane research news briefs to learn more.

Jorgensen, Dave

Monday, June 4, 2012

Jorgensen, Dave

Riding turbulence to improve storm warnings

During his NOAA career, Dave Jorgensen has quite literally experienced a lot of turbulence.

NASA Global Hawk arrives in Virginia to begin NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts

Monday, August 24, 2015

NASA Global Hawk arrives in Virginia to begin NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts

With the August 22 arrival of the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft on Virginia’s eastern shore, scientists and pilots are now ready to start the NOAA-led mission to improve hurricane forecasts of track and intensity using data collected by the Global Hawk during the season’s hurricanes.

 

 

Nemunaitis-Monroe, Kodi

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Nemunaitis-Monroe, Kodi

From sky to summit to sea: tracking raindrops for water level forecasts

Meteorologist Nemunaitis-Monroe oversees a demonstration project to predict water levels in coastal areas during tropical storms and hurricanes.

New mission for the Global Hawk

Thursday, September 11, 2014

New mission for the Global Hawk

NOAA is testing data collected by unmanned aircraft to improve weather forecast operations

For the last five years, NOAA has teamed up with NASA to fly NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft to get an inside look at how hurricanes form and intensify over the Atlantic. The NASA-led project called the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission is demonstrating the ability of the Global Hawk to fly over hurricanes to gather continuous weather data on flights that are longer in duration than possible with manned aircraft. In the next three years, NOAA will take the next step with the Global Hawk, leading a new experiment and continuing its important collaboration with NASA. Drawing on technology and expertise honed in the current mission, NOAA will assess the feasibility of regular operations of Global Hawk to improve day-to-day forecasts of severe storms forming over the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

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