Wednesday, November 22, 2017
 
NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

NOAA's Science On a Sphere® animations coming to your desktop

NOAA releases free downloadable flat screen program, great for students, teachers and science lovers

(September 1) Today NOAA released a free, downloadable flat screen version of its popular Science On a Sphere® (SOS), SOS ExplorerTM. This new way to display the dynamics of Earth’s weather and climate, plate tectonics and more will help teachers bring these stunning science visualizations, usually found at museums and science centers, into the classroom, where students can learn by exploring.


Oil and Gas Wells Contribute Fuel for Ozone Pollution

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Oil and Gas Wells Contribute Fuel for Ozone Pollution

NOAA and University of Colorado scientists confirm that oil and gas well emissions add to ozone pollution

Emissions from oil and natural gas operations north of Denver are releasing gases into the air that could add to ozone pollution in the region.

Pushing the boundaries of research at NOAA in the sky

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Pushing the boundaries of research at NOAA in the sky

Part one of a two-part series on innovative and emerging projects supported by NOAA Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

Taking risks is a necessary part of advancing science. NOAA recognizes the need to invest in these emerging research areas and recently supported several inventive and high-risk projects.
Research physicist named director of Earth System Research Lab Chemical Sciences Division

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Research physicist named director of Earth System Research Lab Chemical Sciences Division

Craig McLean, the acting assistant administrator for NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, announced Wednesday, December 24, that David Fahey, Ph.D., has been selected as the new director of the Earth System Research Laboratory Chemical Sciences Division (CSD), in Boulder, Colorado, effective December 28, 2014.

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California

Monday, December 8, 2014

Researchers offer new insights into predicting future droughts in California

Natural cycles, sea surface temperatures found to be main drivers in ongoing event

According to a new NOAA-sponsored study, natural oceanic and atmospheric patterns are the primary drivers behind California's ongoing drought. A high pressure ridge off the West Coast (typical of historic droughts) prevailed for three winters, blocking important wet season storms, with ocean surface temperature patterns making such a ridge much more likely. Typically, the winter season in California provides the state with a majority of its annual snow and rainfall that replenish water supplies for communities and ecosystems.

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