Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
Scientists probe methane mystery in Four Corners

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Scientists probe methane mystery in Four Corners

Satellite pinpointed methane emission hotspot in remote region

A team of scientific investigators is now in the Four Corners region of the U.S. Southwest, aiming to uncover reasons for a mysterious methane hotspot detected from space by a European satellite. The joint project is working to solve the mystery from the air, on the ground, and with mobile laboratories.

Scientists show climate patterns may influence extreme U.S. tornado seasons

Monday, October 15, 2012

Scientists show climate patterns may influence extreme U.S. tornado seasons

NOAA and university researchers believe they have found a climate signal related to a specific phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation that could be linked to, and possibly serve as a predictor of, massive tornado outbreaks.

Scientists working to crack key air quality and climate mysteries in U.S. Southeast

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Scientists working to crack key air quality and climate mysteries in U.S. Southeast

Scientists this summer are taking one of the most detailed looks ever at the natural and manmade emissions that affect air quality in the Southeast, and their movement and chemical transformations within the atmosphere. The mission should help scientists determine the origin of the fine particles and how they contribute to the haziness in the region and affect regional air quality and temperature trends.

Smoking out an air pollutant’s hot spots

Monday, April 30, 2012

Smoking out an air pollutant’s hot spots

New study identifies parts of the world with highest levels of isocyanic acid

A smoke-related chemical, isocyanic acid, may be a significant air pollutant in some parts of the world, especially where forest fires and other forms of biomass burning are common.

Studying the air above oil and gas production areas in the western United States

Friday, March 20, 2015

Studying the air above oil and gas production areas in the western United States

NOAA and CIRES lead airborne field campaign to look at climate and air quality impacts

Vast regions west of the Mississippi River are under development for oil and gas extraction, and the associated equipment has become a familiar sight on any cross-country road trip or flight.  But while one focus is on what comes out of the ground, NOAA and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) researchers and their colleagues are studying what escapes to the air—and how it is transformed in the atmosphere and affects air quality and climate.  The scientists are using a suite of state-of-the-art chemical instruments aboard a research aircraft this spring in the NOAA-led Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX 2015) field campaign, to study the atmospheric effects of energy production in the western United States.
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