Saturday, October 21, 2017
 
A deadly flood that helped improve weather forecasting

Friday, July 29, 2016

A deadly flood that helped improve weather forecasting

A look at progress in 40 years since Colorado's Big Thompson flood of July 31, 1976

The Big Thompson flood of 1976 was one of three major flash floods during the span of five years in the 1970s that killed more than 450 people across the country -- tragic events that helped spur the modernization of NOAA’s National Weather Service flood forecasting system.

A sea change in the Arctic atmosphere

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

A sea change in the Arctic atmosphere

Thinning sea ice in spring affects ozone chemistry with implications for mercury contamination

Arctic warming has thinned springtime sea ice across the Arctic Ocean. A new study shows that this alters the chemistry of the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface and may increase the amount of toxic mercury contaminating the region.

Accounting for Denver’s Ozone

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Accounting for Denver’s Ozone

First study to quantify effect of oil and gas emissions on ozone problem

The first peer-reviewed study to quantify oil and gas emissions on Colorado's northern Front Range confirms that energy development is an important contributor to the region’s chronic ozone problem. The NOAA-CIRES research was published August 8 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

Air pollution levels from Deepwater Horizon spill similar to large urban area

Monday, December 19, 2011

Air pollution levels from Deepwater Horizon spill similar to large urban area

The amount of air pollutants in the atmospheric plume generated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was similar to a large city according to a new NOAA-led study published today in a special issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
American Chemical Society honors measurement set at NOAA observatory

Thursday, April 23, 2015

American Chemical Society honors measurement set at NOAA observatory

Atmospheric CO2 record at Mauna Loa named National Historic Chemical Landmark

The American Chemical Society will designate the Keeling Curve – a long-term record of rising carbon dioxide in the planet’s atmosphere -- as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a ceremony April 30 at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii.


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