Wednesday, December 13, 2017
 
Air pollution levels from Deepwater Horizon spill similar to large urban area

Monday, December 19, 2011

Air pollution levels from Deepwater Horizon spill similar to large urban area

The amount of air pollutants in the atmospheric plume generated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was similar to a large city according to a new NOAA-led study published today in a special issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year

Ozone hole not as large as late 1990s, early 2000s

The Antarctic ozone hole, which forms annually in the August to October period, reached its peak size on September 11, stretching to 9.3 million square miles (24.1 million square kilometers), roughly the same size as last year’s peak of 9.3 million square miles (24 million square kilometers) on September 16, 2013. This is an area similar in size to North America.

Asian emissions can increase ground-level ozone pollution in U.S. West

Monday, March 5, 2012

Asian emissions can increase ground-level ozone pollution in U.S. West

Springtime air pollution from Asia, swept across the Pacific Ocean on winds, can contribute to episodes of high surface ozone pollution in the western United States.

Chemical measurements confirm official estimate of Gulf oil spill rate

Monday, January 9, 2012

Chemical measurements confirm official estimate of Gulf oil spill rate

New NOAA-led analysis shows gases and oil in three chemically different mixtures deep underwater, in the surface slick, in the air

By combining detailed chemical measurements in the deep ocean, in the oil slick, and in the air, NOAA scientists and academic colleagues have independently estimated how fast gases and oil were leaking during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
CIRES, NOAA observe significant methane leaks in a Utah natural gas field

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

CIRES, NOAA observe significant methane leaks in a Utah natural gas field

On a perfect winter day in Utah’s Uintah County in 2012, CIRES scientists and NOAA colleagues tested out a new way to measure methane emissions from a natural gas production field. Their results, accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, constitute a proof-of-concept that could help both researchers and regulators better determine how much of the greenhouse gas and other air pollutants leak from oil and gas fields. 
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