Tuesday, November 21, 2017
 
Alin, Simone

Monday, April 25, 2016

Alin, Simone

Understanding the ocean's changing chemistry

Ocean chemistry is changing faster right now than at any time over the past 50 million years. “We are fundamentally altering marine ecosystems,” says NOAA oceanographer Simone Alin, Ph.D. With her colleagues at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Alin is responsible for monitoring the rapidly changing chemistry of seawater and understanding the ramifications for the world’s oceans, particularly the highly productive, fisheries-rich coastal waters off the west coast of North America. 

Barnes, Elizabeth

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Barnes, Elizabeth

Questioning rivers in the sky

Since the 1960s scientists have used the so-called "butterfly effect" to explain why we struggle to predict such extreme events with more than two weeks of advanced notice. But Elizabeth Barnes, Assistant Professor at Colorado State University, is pushing the envelope. Barnes likes making complex things simple, and with her team is turning the theory about Earth’s chaotic weather patterns on its head.

Elgin, Ashley

Friday, August 11, 2017

Elgin, Ashley

Is too many mussels even possible?

Those not familiar with the Great Lakes freshwater coasts may wonder how a seemingly endless supply of mussels could possibly be a bad thing. After all, saltwater mussels considered a delicacy by many, is a common item found on your favorite restaurant’s menu. Unfortunately, the freshwater dreissenid mussel is not only an unwelcomed item on the menu, but also in North America’s freshwater waterways. These invasive mussels have very few natural predators to limit their numbers, so their populations continue to grow and spread, wreaking havoc on the Great Lakes food web.

Findell, Kirsten

Friday, September 9, 2011

Findell, Kirsten

Exploring the relationship between land and climate

Using high-powered computers, Kirsten Findell examines floods and droughts, land-atmosphere interactions, and land cover and land use change.

Heinselman, Pam

Monday, September 16, 2013

Heinselman, Pam

Phased-Array Radar Improving Storm Forecasting with Rapid Scanning Technology

Dr. Pam Heinselman, with NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory, is improving storm warning capabilities during severe weather events using phased-array radar technology and collaborating with National Weather Service forecasters.
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