Thursday, December 14, 2017
 

NOAA launches unprecedented effort to discover how El Niño affects weather

Pacific research goal is to improve accuracy of weather forecasts and models

Monica.Allen 0 17988
NOAA scientists and partners have embarked on a land, sea, and air campaign in the tropical Pacific to study the current El Niño and gather data in an effort to improve weather forecasts thousands of miles away.

Rapid, affordable energy transformation possible

NOAA, CIRES study: Wind, sun could eclipse fossil fuels for electric power by 2030

Monica.Allen 0 32778

The United States could slash greenhouse gas emissions from power production by up to 78 percent below 1990 levels within 15 years while meeting increased demand, according to a new study by NOAA and University of Colorado Boulder researchers.

The study used a sophisticated mathematical model to evaluate future cost, demand, generation and transmission scenarios. It found that with improvements in transmission infrastructure, weather-driven renewable resources could supply most of the nation’s electricity at costs similar to today’s.

NOAA and Raytheon improve unmanned aircraft to collect hurricane weather data

Monica.Allen 0 7422
NOAA and Raytheon successfully demonstrated several improvements to the Coyote Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) while completing a mid-flight launch from the NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft on January 7, 2016. The flight verified new technology designed to improve Coyote’s ability to collect vital weather data to improve hurricane forecasts.

mPING Weather App Goes Global

Monica.Allen 0 7125

Citizen scientists around the world, not just those in the United States, can now submit weather observations and view reports on the go using the newly upgraded mPING smart phone application. Developers from NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory and the University of Oklahoma’s Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies announced the app’s expanded reach and utility Monday during the American Meteorological Society’s annual meeting in New Orleans.

 

Great Lakes water levels at or above average for next 6 months

NOAA and Army Corps issue forecast, consider El Niño potential impact

Monica.Allen 0 19399
Scientists from NOAA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Environment Canada have issued a six-month forecast for water levels to be at or above average on Lake Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie into spring of 2016. Lake Ontario water levels are expected to remain close to monthly averages. However, the impacts of the anticipated strong El Niño and other atmospheric anomalies on the forecast are difficult to predict.
First3456789101112Last

Most Popular In Depth

GFDL Internships Support NOAA, Community Diversity Efforts

GFDL Internships Support NOAA, Community Diversity Efforts Read more

This summer, NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) hosted 10 interns, ranging from a high school senior to graduate students well on their way to their Ph.D. degrees. Each intern conducted research relevant to GFDL’s climate-science mission, and most presented their findings at GFDL and at their home institutions.

Small Mussels with Big Effects: Invasive Quagga Mussels Eat Away at...

Small Mussels with Big Effects: Invasive Quagga Mussels Eat Away at... Read more

Since hitching unsolicited rides in boat ballast water in the late 1980s, invasive quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), which are native to Ukraine, have caused massive changes to the ecology of the Great Lakes.  These invasive mussels have also taken a toll on the Great Lakes recreational and commercial fisheries, which are valued at $4-7 million annually.

Texas Sea Grant researchers help beach visitors avoid the grip of rip...

Texas Sea Grant researchers help beach visitors avoid the grip of rip... Read more

Dr. Chris Houser was studying rip current development on a beach in Florida when he noticed something curious: many beachgoers were spreading their beach blankets on the sand directly in front of an active rip current and swimming in the rip channel.

Never Missing an Opportunity, Ship of Opportunity That Is, to Collect...

Never Missing an Opportunity, Ship of Opportunity That Is, to Collect... Read more

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the words carbon dioxide? Is it the ocean? In this day and age, it should be. The ocean absorbs about one fourth of the extra carbon dioxide in the air that is released through human activity, according to a researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Clearing up a cloudy view of phytoplankton's role in the climate system

Clearing up a cloudy view of phytoplankton's role in the climate system Read more

Phytoplankton - tiny plant-like organisms drifting through the great, vast ocean - are barely visible to the naked eye, and some are visible only through a microscope. Yet, when they are thriving, it is possible to see them from as far away as space. Their location is marked by swirling patterns of bright blues and greens that give the ocean a slick, marbled appearance, like oil on water.


Research Videos

Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Headquarters

1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301-713-2458