Saturday, December 16, 2017
 

NOAA invests $4.5 million to improve ocean observations for weather and climate prediction

Monica.Allen 0 15274

NOAA’s Climate Program Office announced today that it is investing $4.5 million in four projects to test technology designed to improve the Tropical Pacific Observing System, an array of buoys in the tropical Pacific used to better understand El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), how it develops, and how it affects Earth’s weather.

Ocean temperatures may hold key to predicting tornado outbreaks

Research by NOAA and partners may be key to seasonal outlooks for regional tornado outbreaks

Monica.Allen 0 11203

Tornados are one of nature’s most destructive forces. Currently, our capacity to predict tornados and other severe weather risks does not extend beyond seven days. In a recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists with NOAA and the University of Miami identified how patterns in the spring phases of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), coupled with variability in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, could help predict U.S. regional tornado outbreaks. 

Water Resources Dashboard provides “one-stop shop” for water data needs

New tool helps communities become more resilient to water hazards and threats

Monica.Allen 0 9391

All regions and economic sectors in the United States depend on adequate and reliable water supplies. Too much or too little water can endanger the health and welfare of citizens and businesses. Driven by feedback from water resource managers, federal agencies and others, NOAA and partners have developed the Water Resources Dashboard: a one-stop website for relevant water data on drought, flooding, precipitation, climate and other measures. 

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