Tuesday, October 17, 2017
 
NOAA scientists tackle mystery of nighttime thunderstorms

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

NOAA scientists tackle mystery of nighttime thunderstorms

Researchers will use array of scientific instruments to probe nighttime thunderstorms on the Great Plains

This summer, more than 20 NOAA scientists will stay up late to learn why some thunderstorms form and grow at night, without the energy from the sun's heat. They will be participating in the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN), a large, intensive field campaign to collect data before and during nighttime thunderstorms in the western Great Plains from June 1 to July 15. 

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Research needed to resolve connections between Arctic warming and severe weather

It is too soon to know if recent extreme cold weather such as the last two East Coast winters are linked to Arctic climate warming, according to new research published in the Journal of Climate by James Overland of NOAA, and other authors from North America, Asia and Europe.

Round-the-world sailors help NOAA gather data in Southern Ocean to improve forecasts

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Round-the-world sailors help NOAA gather data in Southern Ocean to improve forecasts

NOAA’s Drifter program will catch a lift with Volvo Ocean Race

If you’ve ever sailed aboard a ship in the ocean, or checked a weather report before heading to the beach, then you are one of many millions of people who benefit from ocean observations. NOAA collects ocean observations and weather data to provide mariners with accurate forecasts of seas, coastal weather forecasts and regional climate predictions. Partnerships are essential to maintaining a network of free-floating, data-gathering buoys known as drifters. NOAA’s latest partner is not your typical research or ocean transportation vessel: the six sailboats and crew currently racing around the world in the Volvo Ocean Race.

 

NOAA’s growing weather observations database goes into full operations

Thursday, February 19, 2015

NOAA’s growing weather observations database goes into full operations

Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System harnesses more than 64,000 sources of data

More robust observational data gives weather forecasters better information to develop a forecast. But data from so many different sources – 64,000 – is not easily integrated. That’s where scientists at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory came in to develop the system called the Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS) to make this wealth of data more accessible and usable.  This research project successfully transitioned into operations by NOAA’s National Weather Service in late January. It is another example of NOAA’s work to strengthen the effectiveness of the National Weather Service to provide environmental intelligence to communities and businesses, enabling them to become ready, responsive and resilient in the face of extreme weather, water and climate events.
Rivers in the sky

Friday, January 16, 2015

Rivers in the sky

Yes, there are rivers in the sky!  Atmospheric rivers, to be exact, are narrow bands of moisture that regularly form above the Pacific Ocean and flow towards North America’s west coast, drenching it in rain and packing it with snow.   These rivers, which transport more water than the Amazon or the Mississippi, have a far-reaching impact - even on the food you may be eating today.

With this week’s  January 14 sailing of NOAA’s largest ship, the Ronald H. Brown, a major investigation of atmospheric rivers named CalWater 2015 is now underway.

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